Aim: 

To identify if music can influence human’s blood pressure.

Hypothesis: 

If one listens to fast music, then the blood pressure would increases, while if one listens calm music, one’s blood pressure would reduce because of the variety of tempo. Study has shown that with faster tempo, one presents significantly increased ventilation, breathing rate, SBP and DBP, mid-cerebral artery blood flow velocity and heart rate, while slower tempo, one’s heart rate would have less effect on the human body and the heart rate would slow down. (Brooke, Linda)

How to obtain a representative sample from a target population:

I would randomly select a group of participants from a population where no one has hypertension (high blood pressure), hypotension (low blood pressure), or any diseases that affect their blood pressure.

Procedure: 

  1. randomly select a group of participants from the population as described in “How to obtain a representative sample from a target population” 
  2. Ask for consents and inform them their rights base on the ethical guideline in page 22 of Psychology Course Companion by John Crane and Jette Hannibal
  3. play 2 sets of slow music to each participants (i.e. landfill, tranquil landscape)
  4. measure heart rate and record them neatly on a table
  5. repeat steps 3-4 two more times
  6. play 2 sets of fast music to each participants (i.e your love is my drug, take me home)
  7. measure heart rate and record them neatly on a table
  8. repeat steps 6-7 two more times
  9. calculate the average and put into excel.

How to ensure my experiment is ethical: 

I will reveal my aim to the participants at the beginning of the experiment and ensure their rights: the ability to withdraw from the experiment at any time; confidentiality of the profile. I will strictly follow the ethics list in Psychology Course Companion page 22.

Bibliography: 

Brookes, Linda. “Music Can Reduce Blood Pressure, Depending on the Tempo.” Medscape. Mescape Education. Web. 22 Sept. 2015.

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